Lucy M. Alford

Lucy M. Alford
Collegiate Assistant Professor, Humanities
  • Department of English
  • The College
lalford@uchicago.edu
Lucy Alford specializes in twentieth- and twenty-first-century American poetry and poetics, with additional foci in modern and contemporary poetries in English, Arabic, French, and German.
 
She holds a PhD in Comparative Literature from Stanford University, where she held the Ric Weiland Fellowship and spent a year at the Stanford Humanities Center as a Geballe Fellow.
 
Her dissertation, Forms of Poetic Attention, explores the particular modes of attention poems both produce and require. She is currently revising this manuscript for publication.
 
Before Stanford, she received an MLitt by Research and first PhD from the University of Aberdeen’s Centre for Modern Thought, with a dissertation on problems in post-foundational ethics.
 
Her scholarly work has appeared in Philosophy & Literature, Dibur, and Modern Language Notes, and her poems have been published in The Warwick Review and Harpur Palate.
 
Future research projects include a phenomenology of the aesthetics of “cool” in twentieth-century poetry and photography, as well as an investigation of how “tone of voice” plays out in poetry and digital communications.
 
She is also at work on two creative projects: Annals, a poetic exploration of the passage of time, and On X, a collection of poems inspired by the essays of Montaigne.

Education:
 
PhD, Comparative Literature, Stanford University, 2016
PhD, Modern Thought, University of Aberdeen, 2012
MLitt by Research, Modern Thought, University of Aberdeen, 2008
BA, Political and Social Thought, English Literature, and Poetry Writing, University of Virginia, 2005
 
Research Interests:
 
Poetry and Poetics | Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century American and British Literature | Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Literature in English, French, German and Arabic | Modernisms | Emerging Aesthetic Practices of the Contemporary | Human and Non-Human Ethics | Philosophical and Phenomenological Approaches to Literary Experience