Andrew Yale

Email: 

yale@uchicago.edu

Research Interests: 

19th-Century American Literature; Experimental Film; Politics of Intellectual and Other Sorts of Labor

Graduation Year: 

2015

Dissertation Title: 

"Museum Medium"

Publications: 

“Feces on the Philosophy of History!  A Manifesto of the MLA Subconference,” Pedagogy 14:3 (Fall 2014).  Co-authored with the MLA Subconference organizing committee.

Biography: 

Andrew Yale is completing a dissertation on the aesthetic reception and transformation of the nineteenth-century encyclopedic museum in American poetic, visual, and media cultures of the twentieth century, with an expected defense date of February 2015. Focusing on the work of Henry Mercer, Vachel Lindsay, Joseph Cornell, Harry Smith, and Chris Ware, the dissertation argues for an understanding of modernism as partly continuous with rather than dispensing entirely with the pictorial, decorative, and lyric modes associated with nineteenth-century aesthetic norms that privileged beauty and pleasure.  The broad claim is that fully understanding what the modernist avant-garde was up to when it turned to the past requires a recognition that the encyclopedic museum of the nineteenth century afforded ample conceptual resources for modernist writers and artists working across media.

Andrew has also long been involved in organizing, advocacy, and service in the profession as a member of the Committee on Contingent Labor in the Profession of the Modern Language Association, the organizing committee of the MLA Subconference, the Committee on Graduate and Professional Students of the American Association of University Professors, the University of Chicago Provost’s Graduate Teaching Committee, and as a founding member of University of Chicago’s Graduate Students United (AFT/AAUP).

Teaching Experience: 

Instructor, Melville’s Material Cultures (Spring 2015) and Introduction to Contemporary Global Issues (Winter 2013); writing instructor for first-year humanities core sequences (2009-13); teaching assistant in Shakespeare, ancient Greek drama, and American literatures (2007-09)